Friday, July 24, 2020

20 Questions for Individuals and Organizations




  1. Are any types of negative behavior being rewarded and perhaps even honored?
  2. Is it common for agreement to be rushed when it should be delayed?
  3. How much does top leadership know about how the organization really operates at the lower levels?
  4. Do the primary goals still make sense?
  5. Can the strategic plan be easily described in a paragraph or two?
  6. How many top-notch performers have left in the past year?
  7. What was done to keep them?
  8. Are there any ongoing turf wars between departments?
  9. Have any solutions created new problems that are as bad or worse than the original problems?
  10. Is trust fostered on a daily basis?
  11. What is the biggest problem which most people know of but no one talks about?
  12. What action could be taken within a week that would produce the greatest amount of good in the shortest amount of time?
  13. Which three things do you hope remain the same over the next 12 months?
  14. Which three things do you hope change over the next 12 months?
  15. Is time an ally or an adversary?
  16. Is top leadership rowing in the same direction?
  17. What are the most dangerous assumptions?
  18. Are there any crucial subjects that key people pretend to know but which no one really knows?
  19. Are some windows of opportunity about to close?
  20. Is there sufficient transparency?

8 comments:

Unknown said...

"The best way to get smarter... to grow and to improve is to ask questions — a lot of them."
- Darren Hardy

Thanks for posting.
Karen DeLange

Michael Wade said...

Karen,

You are very welcome.

Thanks for the Darren Hardy quote.

Michael

Unknown said...

Thanks for posting this article. The questions are great. This is a pretty comprehensive list that would produce lots of data. Some of it is goals, strategy, leadership, culture and each would require a unique plan of action. Would you suggest breaking it up and giving parts or just choosing the ones that matter to your organization right now?

Michael Wade said...

Thanks!

In general, I lean toward just choosing the ones that apply to your organization right now and keeping the others in reserve for when the time is most appropriate.

As you know, the right question at the wrong time may be ignored due to a perceived lack of urgency. This drives many of us wild because we want to address matters long before they become urgent.

A good ground rule, however, is to raise any particular question when we feel there is a reasonable chance that it will be given an appropriate amount of attention.

I hope this is of assistance.

Michael

Samantha Souvatzis said...

Great questions! I think some of these questions can also be asked to employer during an interview. What do you think?

Michael Wade said...

Samantha,

Thank you!

I would not be inclined to ask them during an interview. These questions can be unsettling to some - perhaps many - employers and they'd get defensive. The last thing you want when seeking a job is a defensive employer. You want to put them at ease.

My recommendation would be to raise them after getting the job and while in a position where you are simply finding out more about how the place operates.

Michael

Unknown said...

I can see these during an exit interview or even specific ones during a check-in or mid-review conversation.

Unknown said...

I like this list as discussion prompts, but I can imagine some folks trying to cram them into a survey of some kind.